DTX2b

Apr 26
fastcompany:

Facebook’s former head of marketing (and Mark’s sister) is using her social media mojo to coordinate influential people to post about world issues. Your favorite follows just got a lot more earnest. But does caring on social media mean anything in the real world?

 Randi Zuckerberg’s “Social Media Syndicate”: Taking On AIDS Armed Only With Online Influence

fastcompany:

Facebook’s former head of marketing (and Mark’s sister) is using her social media mojo to coordinate influential people to post about world issues. Your favorite follows just got a lot more earnest. But does caring on social media mean anything in the real world?

Randi Zuckerberg’s “Social Media Syndicate”: Taking On AIDS Armed Only With Online Influence

Apr 26

Esther Quek of The Rake magazine.

guerreisms:

For many it takes a lifetime to discover their personal style, for some it comes effortlessly

Esther Quek by Guerre

Esther Quek by Guerre

Esther Quek by Guerre

Esther Quek by GuerreEsther Quek of The Rake magazine

Apr 26

robertreich:

“The Truth About the Economy in 2 Minutes and 15 Seconds”

Apr 26

@innovations | Washington Post on news innovation: The most popular Washington Post stories on Tumblr for 2011 →

washingtonpostinnovations:


Facebook recently released a list of its top 40 most shared news stories this year, which includes three Washington Post stories. But why should Facebook have all the fun?

Here are the most popular Washington Post stories this year among Tumblr users, based on the number of clicks from…

Apr 26

Fiesta: group email and private mailing list blog: Three Simple Ways to Improve the Security of Your Web App →

fiestacc:

Update: here’s the next post in this series.

It seems like web app security has entered the public conscious recently, probably as a result of the press covering the activities of groups like Anonymous and incidents like security breaches at several CAs. Here are a couple of quick…

Apr 26

Report: Two-thirds of undocumented adults have lived in the US for at least 10 years

univisionnews:


A new report by the Pew Hispanic Center found that a majority of adults who live in the country illegally have strong ties to the U.S. (Getty images) 

By JUAN GASTELUM
Channel: Immigration

Nearly two-thirds of the 10.2 million unauthorized adult immigrants in the United States have lived here for at least 10 years and almost half are parents of underage children, according to a new report by the Pew Hispanic Center.

The report, released Thursday, also found that about 35 percent of the same group have lived in the U.S for more than 15 years, a figure that has more than doubled since 2000.

In the same period, the number of unauthorized adult immigrants who have lived in the country for less than five years has been cut in half, from 32 percent to 15 percent.

Pew’s figures could have an impact on the 2012 presidential campaign: former House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.), one of the leading GOP candidates, has proposed offering legal status to some undocumented immigrants who have lived in the U.S. for decades. His plan has sent shockwaves through the GOP field, which is largely opposed to providing legal recognition to the nation’s 11 million-plus undocumented immigrants.

Most Republican presidential candidates have said they would focus their efforts on stopping the flow of undocumented immigrants into the U.S., but the Pew report indicates that illegal immigration has already begun to significantly subside.

Read More

Apr 26
ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology:

harryallard:

A new paper, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provides a fresh insight into how unicellular organisms formed multicellular organisms, and how evolution began to effect the organism as a whole, rather than it’s constituent cells. This process is what eventually resulted in you sitting there reading this tumblr post.

Since evolution acts on individual cells, it pays off for a cell to be selfish. By hogging resources and hindering neighbours, a cell can increase the odds that more of its own genes get passed into the next generation. This logic is one of the reasons it has been challenging to imagine how multicellularity arose; it requires the subjugation of self-interest in favor of the group’s survival.
In the new paper, researchers at the University of Minnesota at Minneapolis used a simple but elegant technique to artificially select for multicellularity in yeast. They dumped unicellular yeast into a tube of liquid food and waited a few minutes for the cells to settle. Then they extracted the lowest fraction of the liquid and allowed whatever cells it contained to form the next generation. Because the cells had to cluster together in order to sink to the bottom and survive, the artificial selection made it more advantageous for yeast to cooperate than to be solitary.
After just 60 generations, all of the surviving yeast populations had formed snowflake-shaped multicellular clusters. “Hence we know that simple conditions are sufficient to select for multicellularity,” says biologist Michael Travisano, who led the research.
But at what point do the yeast become something more than a cluster of cells? When do they begin behaving as one organism?
In a true multicellular organism, such as a rabbit, evolution acts upon the rabbit and not upon each of the billions of cells that build it. So the researchers set out to determine whether artificial selection would act upon the snowflake yeast as if they too were multicellular organisms. To test it, one batch of the multicellular yeast was allowed only five minutes to settle in a tube (representing a strong selection pressure), while another batch was given 25 minutes (a weaker selection pressure). After 35 generations, the yeast that were exposed to stronger selection evolved to have larger cluster sizes, while those in the weak selection group actually shrank in size. This indicated that each cluster of cells was evolving as one organism.
In addition, time-lapse photography revealed that, in order to reproduce, the multicellular yeast divides itself into branches that develop into the multicellular form as well. The daughter clusters did not create their own offspring until they had reached a similar size as their parents. The presence of this juvenile stage shows that the snowflake yeast had adopted a multicellular way of life, says William Ratcliff, a postdoctoral student in Travisano’s lab.

ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology:

harryallard:

A new paper, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provides a fresh insight into how unicellular organisms formed multicellular organisms, and how evolution began to effect the organism as a whole, rather than it’s constituent cells. This process is what eventually resulted in you sitting there reading this tumblr post.

Since evolution acts on individual cells, it pays off for a cell to be selfish. By hogging resources and hindering neighbours, a cell can increase the odds that more of its own genes get passed into the next generation. This logic is one of the reasons it has been challenging to imagine how multicellularity arose; it requires the subjugation of self-interest in favor of the group’s survival.

In the new paper, researchers at the University of Minnesota at Minneapolis used a simple but elegant technique to artificially select for multicellularity in yeast. They dumped unicellular yeast into a tube of liquid food and waited a few minutes for the cells to settle. Then they extracted the lowest fraction of the liquid and allowed whatever cells it contained to form the next generation. Because the cells had to cluster together in order to sink to the bottom and survive, the artificial selection made it more advantageous for yeast to cooperate than to be solitary.

After just 60 generations, all of the surviving yeast populations had formed snowflake-shaped multicellular clusters. “Hence we know that simple conditions are sufficient to select for multicellularity,” says biologist Michael Travisano, who led the research.

But at what point do the yeast become something more than a cluster of cells? When do they begin behaving as one organism?

In a true multicellular organism, such as a rabbit, evolution acts upon the rabbit and not upon each of the billions of cells that build it. So the researchers set out to determine whether artificial selection would act upon the snowflake yeast as if they too were multicellular organisms. To test it, one batch of the multicellular yeast was allowed only five minutes to settle in a tube (representing a strong selection pressure), while another batch was given 25 minutes (a weaker selection pressure). After 35 generations, the yeast that were exposed to stronger selection evolved to have larger cluster sizes, while those in the weak selection group actually shrank in size. This indicated that each cluster of cells was evolving as one organism.

In addition, time-lapse photography revealed that, in order to reproduce, the multicellular yeast divides itself into branches that develop into the multicellular form as well. The daughter clusters did not create their own offspring until they had reached a similar size as their parents. The presence of this juvenile stage shows that the snowflake yeast had adopted a multicellular way of life, says William Ratcliff, a postdoctoral student in Travisano’s lab.

Apr 26
motherjones:

This is what the US–Mexico border looks like in Big Bend National Park. Or: Why GOP presidential candidates have no idea what they’re talking about when they talk about building a high-security fence on every inch of the border.
(Via)